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Our New Discus Tank - VI

by George J. Reclos

Hemigrammus erythrozonus (Glowlight tetra) Durbin 1909

New Photo

Click on the image to see the high resolution picture. Photo by G.J.Reclos/MCH, August 2004

However, the question for a compatible fish that would swim in the middle of the water column was still not answered. One of our friends, Margarita (you will hear more about her and her tank in a future update) had acquired a school of Hemigrammus rhodostomus which were a really nice addition to her planted tank. I decided to check this genus for other possible candidates and I finally got a school of Hemigrammus erythrozonus (more than 30 fish) which really made the difference. Perhaps not as colorful as the H. rhodostomus (with its bright red head and zebra-like tail) but a really unique fish in the sense that its orange strips seem like fluorescent. The best way to describe this particular color is the normal highlighter we use in our office to mark text. They are really peaceful fish, don't grow more than 4 cm and will not interfere with our discus. One thing that needs to be taken into account is that those fishes have a really tiny mouth and are not able to eat even medium sized pellets thus you need to crush them beforehand and create a powder. Crushed flakes will also be taken eagerly. The fish will swim all the time at varying depths but never near the surface unless your plants create a shaded area. They will normally form 2-3 large schools although sometimes you can see all of them swimming together - a beautiful sight. Those fishes come from the Essequibo river in Guyana which - of course - doesn't belong to the Amazon basin. However, you must admit that it is quite close to it from many points, especially water parameter requirements, which are very soft water and acidic pH. When I take a step back and look at this tank now, I get the feeling that this tank is now complete. Of course, now starts the maintenance stage which is not any easier but whenever I am satisfied with a tank I regard water changes and measurements as a pleasure..

Photo of the Month - October 2002

Continued in next page

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