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Acanthicus adonis (Isbrucker & Nijssen, 1988)

new photos - March 2005

Click on the thumbnails for a larger image. Photos by G.J.Reclos /MCH

new photos - November 2004

Click on the thumbnails for a larger image. Photos by G.J.Reclos /MCH

new photos - October 2004

Top left: Working on a piece of bogwood covered with algae. It may be of interest to note that they will eat this type of algae, too. Top right and second row - left: Close up of the mouth. Bottom row (right): the fish is less shy as time passes by. Photo by G.J.Reclos /MCH (October 2004)

 

Click on the thumbnails for a larger image. Photos by G.J.Reclos /MCH (August 2004)

Profile - by Marina Parha

Acanthicus Adonis (Isbrucker & Nijssen, 1988)

Name

Acanthicus Adonis (Isbrucker & Nijssen, 1988)

Description

Acanthicus Adonis

Family

Loricariidae

Size in cm

60 cm

Distribution

Rio Tocantins, Brazil

Water Parameters

ph 6,4 - 7,6, 20-30C, clear well oxygenated water

Sexing and Breeding

Males have thick odontal growth on the first ray of the pectoral fins and their back. It has been bred in captivity.

Feeding

Acanthicus Adonis is an omnivore. It will happily accept prawn, mussels, cockle and small pieces of fish. Large bloodworms are also welcome. It needs vegetable matter in its diet and will eat cucumber, spinach, potato and sweet potato. Provide fruit, such as mango, as a delicacy.

The fish will rasp on wood. Young fish feed almost exclusively on algae and biofilm. As the fish grows up it ceases to manifest a specific preference in algae.

Behaviour in Captivity

Quite an aggressive fish, ready to defend its supremacy in the tank with fights. Territorial disputes are quite common. It is likely to stress other less aggressive or smaller bottom dwelling fish. Given time, and once it gets used to its tank mates the fights will cease, provided there is enough food and space for all. To make it moderate its behaviour ensure it is not the biggest bottom dweller in your tank.

Acanthicus Adonis is one of the relatively easy fish to keep in your tank and an elegant, striking addition! Yet, to avoid potential problems, it is important to take into account the space requirements this fish has. Acanthicus Adonis has an active presence in the tank, not feeling the need to hide as other bottom dwellers do.

I have noticed that my adult female always chased other fish away from food even when she wasn’t eating it herself. This went on until I added a much bigger L25 in the tank. The two fish never challenged each other; but the presence of a stronger  and more aggressive fish forced the Acanthicus to abstain from causing trouble. The same has been observed with my younger Acanthicus, which joined the tank at 2cm TL. She has always been an excellent feeder who minds her own business despite the fact she is now a good 6 inch TL. Strangely enough, the L155s manifested the same behaviour. As it has been suggested that Acanthicus Adonis is a variation of the L155 I tend to believe that the fish will only fight if it feels confident it will win the battle.

The striking pattern of Acanthicus is said to change with age, as the white spots diminish or disappear entirely.

The fish prefer sand as substrate and big pieces of wood or stone to hide under. Due to the size, natural strength and temperament of this fish its important to furnish the tank with sturdy pieces of the materials indicated, as the fish can easily move light objects.

Click on the thumbnails for a larger image. Photos by G.J.Reclos /MCH (May 2004)

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