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Enantiopus sp. "kilesa"

Scientific name: Enantiopus sp. "kilesa"
Trade name:  
Natural habitat: Sandy environments near beaches
Food in the lake: Small crustaceans picked from the uper layer of the sand.
Food in the aquarium: Brine shrimp, daphnia and cyclops. Also quality flakes and small pellets or grains can be fed. Avoid overfeeding, as this will cause diseases.
Behaviour in my aquarium: Must be kept in a group of about 8 fish to bring their best courtship behaviour to the surface.
Tankmates: Xenotilapia, Cyprichromis, Cyatopharynx and other peaceful Tanganyika species. The very robust Petrochromis or Tropheus have to be avoided.
Maximal size: Grows to about 16 cm.
Aquarium: A tank with a very large open space, at least 60cm x 160cm, covered with fine sand, pH about 8.5, temperature about 25°C

 



Enantiopus sp. "kilesa" in my aquarium. You can see the sand coming out of his gills.


Personal notes:

Love at first sight! That's my main comment on these cute Tanganyika sand dwellers! A nice group of 12 Enantiopus swim happily in my tank, and I don't regret that for one single moment. At day 1 they were a bit shy, but on day 2 they already started to display. After a week they're completely settled in, and although they're still juveniles (8cm - adults are 16cm) they display, build nests, and swim around like little rockets! They're housed in my 1500L kitchen tank, together with the Cyatopharynx furcifer that I bought at the same time.


A photo of them when they still lived in my 800L cellar tank.


Also in the 800L tank a huge nest. I counted 19 neatly ordened piles of sand around it. 
You can also see the nest of the Cyatopharynx furcifer in the back of the tank.


Impressive displaying of one male towards another one. 


More displaying:This usually ends up in chasing each other around in the tank with no casualties though!

Photos and text by MCH (Frank Panis) - see next page for some High Quality photos

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