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L200 (Gold - Yellow Hypostomus)

An excellent L200 specimen photographed in the tanks of "Hydrocosmos".

These three photos, show what this tank housed when I visited Hydrocosmos. A collection of relatively small and extremely beautiful catfish, ranging from expensive to "really" expensive but offering the hobbyist the opportunity to house those real jewels in his tank. The collection includes Hypancistrus zebra (L046), Scobiancistrus aureatus (L014) and of course, Hypostomus sp. L200. With the exception of S. aureatus which grows to over 35 cm, the rest can be housed in small tanks. Click on the images to see the high resolution photos.

Profile - by Marina Parha

Name

Ancistrinae, Baryancistrus demantoides / Hemiancistrus Subviridis, L200 (Werneke et al, 2005)

Description

L200, Lemon Spotted Pleco, Green Phantom

Family

Loricariidae

Size in cm

20 cm

Distribution

Venezuela, Brazil

Water Parameters

pH 6,2-7,6. 22-25C, but can easily adapt to temperatures up to 29C. Prefers soft, fast flowing water. It is stipulated that the acidity of the water may influence the colouration of the fish.

Sexing and breeding

The fish haven’t been bred in captivity and there is no information available on sexing. It has been suggested that the hi-fin and larger, more intense coloured spots may be characteristics of males.

Feeding

At a young age biofilm and algae are required. It grows to be an omnivore which will eat mussel, cockle, prawn, shrimp, blood worm, white worm but also algae, vegetables (they are a must) and fruit. Provide spinach, peas, cucumber and courgette. L200s will also accept commercially prepared food.

Behaviour in captivity

A resilient and sociable fish which will avoid getting into trouble. It prefers smaller or equal size tank mates though it can easily adapt to living with larger fish. Rock or wood are equally acceptable as hiding places, though wood is required for rasping.

Our knowledge of L200 is limited. Differences in both colouration and morphology have been observed. Some fish have a hi-fin, others have larger spots. Spot distribution also varies: some individuals display spots mainly on their head while others have spots all the way down to their dorsal fin. The shape of the caudal fin may also differ – some individuals have a scissor-like cut while on others have a straight ending is observed. The colour ranges from bluish-green with pale blue spots to yellowish-green with yellow or white spots (some of these differences can be observed in the picture). There has been the view that differences such as these are due to sexual dimorphism. Others believe that the acidity of the natural habitat of the fish is the main cause behind colouration variations (fish coming from the northern part of the river have a darker colouration to those coming from the southern part). Another possibility is that the L200 is the same species as the L128.

Lately a distinction between different types of L200 has been introduced: some are considered to belong to the Baryancistrus species while others are thought to be Hemiancistrus. The distinguishing features are stated as shape of head, shape of dorsal fin and the position of the adipose fin in relation to the dorsal fin.  Hemiancistrus species are thought to have a flatter head and a much softer curve on their dorsal fin, which doesn’t drop back to their body at the back end. Further, the dorsal fin of the Hemiancistrus species doesn’t connect to the adipose fin.  If this turns out to be a valid distinction, it may also be the reason that specific individuals manifest different behaviour in the tank regarding their sociability, levels of activity and preferred hiding areas.

You can read the Greek version of this profile in

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