HOME

GEORGE RECLOS

FRANK PANIS

FRANCESCO ZEZZA

PATRICIA SPINELLI

ARTICLES

FISH INDEX

PROFESSIONALS

AQUARIUM CONSERVATION PROGRAMME (ACP)

PHOTO GALLERY

LINKS

BOOK REVIEW

AWARDS

MARINE TANK

DISCOVER MEDITERRANEAN

SIDE EFFECTS

HOBBYIST'S GALLERY

MACRO & NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

DISASTERS WITH DAVE

MCH-DUTCH

MCH-DEUTSCH

ARTIKELN

MCH PO POLSKU

ARTYKUŁY

ΑΡΧΙΚΗ

ΑΡΘΡΑ

ΕΙΔΗ ΨΑΡΙΩΝ

ΕΠΑΓΓΕΛΜΑΤΙΕΣ

ΦΩΤΟΓΡΑΦΙΕΣ

ΣΥΝΔΕΣΜΟΙ

ΒΙΒΛΙΟΓΡΑΦΙΑ

ΒΡΑΒΕΙΑ

 

 

 

Scobiancistrus aureatus - L014


The fish shown has the adult coloration of the species (fish size 20cm +). Photo taken in the 13th Belgian Cichlid Show, fish exhibited by Hustinx Discus Shop, Hasselt, Belgium. Photos by MCH. Bottom picture shows one of the juveniles currently in my tank. The size and number of dots changes with age as well as the amount of orange in the fins and tail. A magnificent pleco, even at this size (5 cm !)

Profile - by Marina Parha

Name

Scobinancistrus aureatus, L14 (Burgess, 1994)

Common Name

Goldie Pleco, Sunshine Pleco, Scobi

Family

Loricariidae

Size

45 cm

Distribution

Rio Xingu, Brazil

Water Conditions

pH 6-7,4, 25-29C. Prefers medium to fast flowing, well oxygenated, clear, soft water. Medium hard water is also acceptable.

Sexing and Breeding

Males are longer than females and have small acanthes all over their body, giving a bristled appearance. The first pectoral ray is better pronounced and spikey in males. The first ray of the caudal fin is also better pronounced in mature males. The snout of the males is more squared as opposed to the rounder snout of females. There are no reports regarding breeding the L14 in a home aquarium. More likely this is due to its large size and corresponding requirements for aquarium space

Feeding

At an early age they prefer algae and biofilm. As they grow they manifest a noticeable preference to fish flesh and vegetables. Prawn, mussel, cockle and bloodworm are all welcome. Courgette and algae, cucumber and brussel sprouts will also be considered a treat. Live or frozen food is a must for this fish, though they will easily take tablets too once they get acclimatized. The occasional offer of prawn shell is recommended.

Behaviour in Captivity

Young fish prefer hiding places from stone or slate and narrow passages, particularly if they cohabit with larger, more aggressive bottom dwellers. As they grow up they prefer more open spaces and hiding areas made of wood. L14s are sociable and easy to keep with other bottom dwellers. When acclimatized they are quite visible in the tank, as opposed to other Loricariids.

Treat with care during acclimatisation as L14s are quite shy, particularly when introduced to a new environment. More than likely the new arrival  will not be eating for a while. Put some food near its hiding place and ensure it eats. Keep the lights off or down during the first weeks. When acclimatised it is quite a tough competitor and can fend for itself. It doesn’t get stressed easily when confronted by more aggressive tankmates  I have noticed all mine “offer” their food when a younger fish competes for it but they will not move an inch when an adult, or similarly sized fish does the same. Another observation is that while mine cohabit fine with Acanthicus Adonis they are always lower down in the hierarchy. Similar behaviour has been observed when the L14 gets into a confrontation with the L114; there will be a fight but but it is always the L14 that gives way despite being a senior member of the tank. My L14s coexist pretty harmoniously with the L25s (no competition or fights observed over a period of 4 years between two colonies consisting of 5 fish each).

Younger fish have a striking colouration, including full gold coloured dorsal and caudal fins. Coloration becomes less intense as the fish grows while the gold shade on the fins gives way to the normal pattern and ends up as a thick line at the top and end part of the dorsal and caudal fins respectively. Yet, even as adults, L14s are impressive fish with a lovely presence in the tank.

You will notice occasionally that some of the fish have a duller colouration or patches of fading pattern. Most of the times this is due to slime, to which the fish is susceptible if the water conditions are not good enough. I treated mine by adding salt to the tank for a week at 0,1% solution and that did the trick. 

It is often said that L14, when full, eats only the skin of the fish and leaves the flesh. Hence the aquarist should take care to remove uneaten food to maintain good water quality. I am not convinced this is the case. I have noticed that mine, on occasions, prefer to eat the “head” of prawns and the shell, living the flesh for other fish. If prawn shells are not provided, they will rasp on sea shells I have in the tank for decoration. I suspect this preference may be related either to their need for specific trace elements or to their digestive function.

Though active and not a recluse, L14 is not the type of fish which will swim around the tank. Beware: should such behaviour be manifested check your water quality and monitor the fish for disease. Restlessness, particularly when combined with swimming towards the top of the tank, is a sure sign something is wrong.

You can read the Greek version of this profile in

Back ] Up ] Next ]

 Page last modified on 06/03/2006  

 

Site Search 

Contact us

       

Malawi Cichlid Homepage © 1999-2006. All rights reserved.