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Photo of the Month - July 2005

Two magnificent photos of a Pseudotropheus saulosi pair. Left: male; right: carrying female. Click on the thumbnails to see the high resolution pictures. Photos by Frank Panis /MCH

Pseudotropeus saulosi is, with a total adult length of about 9cm, one of the smaller Mbuna species, which makes them suited for small  200L/50G tanks. Despite their size, they still can be agressive, what usually doesn't lead to killing. Unlike most other Pseudotropheus species, both male and female have attractive colours. They are all born yellow and only the males become blue when they get sexually mature. As this is completely opposite to the colour patterns of Pseudotropheus lombardoi (or kenyii) it's not sensible to keep them in the same aquarium, as this only causes brutal harassment of the females. Also larger Mbuna as a company can best be avoided The picture below shows the male in transition colouration. Sometimes carrying females can develop male colouration too, probably to look agressive in orded to scare off potential fry robbers or to claim a territory to safely release the fry.


Pseudotropheus saulosi male (left) and female (right) in their rocky 200L aquarium.

The male in different poses. 

Breeding and feeding is quite similar to that of other Mbuna. As they eat algae in nature, a vegetable diet with an additional protein snack (krill, mysis, artemia, chopped shrimp, ... but NO mammal meat!) every now and then is recommended. These Mbuna breed like rabbits, so if you provide many hiding places (many small rocks) in the aquarium, you'll soon get an overcrowded aquarium.

More info on water chemistry,breeding and general topics can be found on this page.


Pseudotropheus saulosi female carrying

Both male and female in front of a real Malawi shell that they used from time to time. Now that they're fully grown they ignore the shells completely. Also notice the transition colouration of the male.

Photos and text by Frank Panis.

Two female Pseudotropheus saulosi. Photo by Lee Nachtigal

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