HOME

GEORGE RECLOS

FRANK PANIS

FRANCESCO ZEZZA

PATRICIA SPINELLI

ARTICLES

FISH INDEX

PROFESSIONALS

AQUARIUM CONSERVATION PROGRAMME (ACP)

PHOTO GALLERY

LINKS

BOOK REVIEW

AWARDS

MARINE TANK

DISCOVER MEDITERRANEAN

SIDE EFFECTS

HOBBYIST'S GALLERY

MACRO & NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

DISASTERS WITH DAVE

MCH-DUTCH

MCH-DEUTSCH

ARTIKELN

MCH PO POLSKU

ARTYKUŁY

ΑΡΧΙΚΗ

ΑΡΘΡΑ

ΕΙΔΗ ΨΑΡΙΩΝ

ΕΠΑΓΓΕΛΜΑΤΙΕΣ

ΦΩΤΟΓΡΑΦΙΕΣ

ΣΥΝΔΕΣΜΟΙ

ΒΙΒΛΙΟΓΡΑΦΙΑ

ΒΡΑΒΕΙΑ

 

 

 

Synodontis njassae


Among the non-cichlids of Lake Malawi there are a few species that can be kept together with our most beloved Mbuna, Aulonocara and Haplochromis. One of them is Synodontis njassae. Being part of a large family of African catfish this Synodontis that belongs to the group of Mochokidae, is endemic to the lake (=lives only in Lake Malawi). There are two variants: one with few large spots and another with many small spots.




It is the variant with the many little spots that swims in my tank.

These attractive but very shy fish can grow up to 20 cm and live 6 years or longer. They are mostly active during the night, when they can disturb other sleeping cichlids. During the day they hide in caves or dark places which they only leave for feeding. The picture below shows a Synodontis swimming in open water something that  happens very seldom. Mostly they stay in touch with the sand or rocks with their barbels to feel and smell their environment rather than seeing it, something  confirmed by my observations. When I'm sitting close to the tank while feeding they come out of their hiding places not bothered by me. When I make a sudden move they flee back to their caves. This shyness sharply contrasts with my Cichlid's behavior: when they see me coming the haps swim towards me in the hope of getting food.




A Synodontis swims in open water - a very rare sight.

In nature they probably eat insects and their larva, crustaceans and invertebrates during the night. In the aquarium, food is taken from the bottom which means that they will eat all sinking pellets, flakes and tablets. Also cichlid eggs are a welcome snack. Some time ago I saw the mating of Pseudotropheus saulosi. The Synodontis was never far away from the breeding couple. He regularly disturbed them by swimming through their mating territory, searching for fresh eggs he just smelled. He didn't have  a chance to steal eggs on the spot but was lucky to find one floating away - which  was quickly eaten. I have no experience about them eating fry but Francesco said he got no fry remaining in a tank which housed them with cichlids. Maybe the Synodontis catch them from their hiding places at night when they're sleeping?



These photo's show from left to right the mating of Ps. saulosi. The third one shows the Synodontis disturbing the love couple. The fourth pic shows that in the end the female's mouth almost bursts from the eggs so not too many of them were eaten.

 Back ] Up ] Next ]

 

 

Site Search 

Contact us

       

Malawi Cichlid Homepage © 1999-2006. All rights reserved.