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Spawning the Parachromis managuensis - 2

By John G. Reclos

The eggs are finally laid and fertilized. We all had the feeling that if Tyson could speak he would just say "Thank you". This is what fish keeping is all about - for me.

The female inspecting the eggs. She would remove every single snail or sand particle from the eggs. She would spend the whole day above her eggs, fanning them, removing particles and of course, watching for intruders.

Time (post egg layering)

Eggs with fungus

Action

12 hours

4

None

24 hours

8

None

36 hours

34

None

48 hours

45

None

60 hours

92

Anti fungus agent at ½ recommended strength

72 hours

104

Eggs hatched

Fertilization rate is never 100%. The unfertilized eggs will be covered with fungus - sooner or later. However, with 1000+ eggs, who cares ?

A close up of the female while fanning her eggs. Click on the thumbnail to see a larger picture.

There is also a video clip showing the female fanning its eggs.

Following hatching, the female would check her eggs every minute and take all “vibrating” eggs in her mouth and transfer them to the pit they have prepared behind the stone. This answered our question why they spent all this energy to dig a pit they didn’t use for spawning after all. The pit was needed for “phase II”. Nice place for the newly hatched eggs but very bad place for us since we couldn’t see them. We were only able to take one photo during this time. After some hours, the only things that were left on the stone were the eggs which had been covered with fungus.

All the fry were removed from the stone just after hatching and placed in a second pit formed in a secure place. The female was now spending her day over the new location.

Four days after hatching we started feeding them with Liquifry (80-300 μm) and baby powder food of the same size. We couldn’t see what was going on behind the stone but we were able to see some fry going for the food. Of course this was a very short sight since the female would rash to take the fry to the pit again, away from our sight. A short glance revealed what we suspected. The female was staying barely over the substrate in the middle of a cloud of fry.

See next page for more information

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