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Plants in the African tank




Above: Detail from the 1.300 liter, non-mbuna tank. An anubia has grown and used both the gravel and the rocks to attach. The roots have attached so strongly on the rocks that removing the rocks without damaging the plant is impossible.

Left: Detail from the planted 500 liter Mbuna tank. An anubia nana flower is the result of near optimum conditions for the plants. The white dots that rise from the plant are oxygen bubbles, a result of intense photosynthesis. In this environment all plants showed their best. Echinodorus sp. for example produced new shouts every month which were cut and planted. As a result, a very dense Amazon swordplant "forest" provided shelter for fry and milder mbuna.

Right: Detail from the 45 liter tank. Java fern pieces attached to bogwood with nylon fishing line. The plant, after attachment, shows a quick growth and is very rarely touched by cichlids - not even mbuna.


Above: Detail from the fry-raising tank. A Ceratophyllum sp. collected by Francesco from Lake Malawi during his recent trip (October 99). The plant is used to decorate one of the  raising tanks, the one which has become the house of the Fossorochromis rostratus wild caught specimens, which Francesco kindly shared with me. A rootless, dense plant, adds much to the appearance of this tank.

See next page for more photos of my plants. 

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